Split and merge orders

Xena has a unique future to split and merge order lines and tasks from one or many open orders on a partner to a new order. This is priceless dealing when with stock count and gathering invoices.

Split and merge order lines from open orders to a new order

Use the split and merge orders feature when you want to:

  1. Split one order into many orders.
  2. Merge multiple open orders into one order.
  3. Gather order lines from one or multiple orders into a new order.

 

Example of using split and merge in connection with stock count

When using stock count, you create buying orders at your suppliers to know products are ordered and to register them when arriving to your stock.

A problem can accur if the articles does not arrive in the order ordered. For this, you can use the feature “Partial delivery”.

But when an invoice arrives from a supplier it can contain multiple orders. Can you make your own orders matching the supplier invoice? Yes, by using “Split and merge”. With this, you can gather the articles that matches the incoming invoice even if ordered on different orders.

 

Use split and merge

The split and merge feature are available everywhere you have a partner or an order (on a specific order, the order list or the order overview). No matter from where you activate the feature it works the same way.

In the following example we start in the order list. Here we have multiple buying orders at our supplier “Azzura”:

Buying orders in Xena

 

Starting the feature opens a dialog. First, find the partner in question and select if you want sales or buying orders (whether the context should customer or supplier). Now, all matching open orders are displayed with tasks and lines.

The Split and merge dialog in Xena

 

Mark the order lines or whole tasks you want to move to a new order. Click the Split and merge button when done.

A new order are created with the order lines and tasks you selected.

Splitted order in Xena

 

It contains information on from where the order lines and tasks are taken. On the orders where they were taken, there are information about where they are moved.